Dec
1
1:00 PM13:00

Ship Biscuit Ornament Making

An almost completely intact ship's biscuit from the 18th centur

y was found in Alexandria last year. To commemorate, visitors can make their own ship's biscuit. Each biscuit will be stamped with the year and then baked at home to track its preservation.

Free, no registration, while supplies last.

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Oct
4
4:00 PM16:00

Virginia Association of Museums MeetUp and Happy Hour

Members of the Virginia Association of Museums are invited to the Alexandria Archaeology Museum to learn about Alexandria's waterfront history. Register for the meetup through http://www.vamuseums.org

In addition or instead, join the group for a Happy Hour at O'Connells, 112 King Sreet. Again, register through http://www.vamuseums.org

 

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Jul
24
6:00 PM18:00

FOAA Happy Hour

Daniel O'Connells (Fitzgerald Room)

112 King Street, Alexandria

Very brief official business meeting, followed by an update from Alexandria Archaeology staff about this summer's excavations and programming.

Hope to see you there!

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Apr
14
12:00 PM12:00

Ship artifact viewing

Bottom of Wolfe Street in Old Town

Learn about and view remains of a newly discovered piece of 18th century ship, used to "fill" the Alexandria waterfront. (The remains will be kept wet for preservation while decisions made about what to do with them.) 

Archaeologists will be on hand to explain the find and answer questions.

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Apr
14
10:00 AM10:00

Java Jolt: "Riding with George:

Alexandria Archaeology Museum, 105 North Union Street, #327

Philip Smucker’s new book, Riding with George: Sportsmanship & Chivalry in the Making of America’s First President, explores George Washington’s love for sports and games and how that passion led to his success on the battlefield and in national politics. According to the Washington Post, his highly-acclaimed new book successfully “confronts the marble, ossified immensity of the historical George Washington and strives to reveal the human side of America’s most legendary figure.” Join Friends of Alexandria Archaeology for a free Java Jolt lecture with Philip Smucker on Saturday, April 14 at the Alexandria Archaeology Museum. 

Smucker is a native Alexandrian and was a Fellow at the National Library for the Study of George Washington at Mount Vernon. Over his thirty-year career as a seasoned reporter, Smucker has worked as a conflict reporter, interviewed world leaders, and worked and written for numerous publications, including The Atlantic Monthly, McClatchy Newspapers, the International Herald Tribune, The New York Times, Asia Times, the Christian Science Monitor, and the Daily Telegraph, London.

A book signing will follow the lecture. Free and open to the public. Reservations are required. Email archaeology@alexandriava.gov or call 703.746.4399.

 

 

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Feb
23
7:00 PM19:00

Late Shift at the Factory: Uncovering the Waterfront

105 South Union Street (Torpedo Factory)

Alexandria’s past comes to life with help from the Alexandria Archaeology Museum. Artists and innovators team up for a night of unearthed secrets, music, and trivia celebrating our region’s rich history.

Presented in collaboration with the Torpedo Factory Art Center. Free. No registration required. For more information, please call 703.746.4399

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Sep
16
10:00 AM10:00

Java Jolt: Meet the Author

Alexandria Archaeology Museum

Torpedo Factory, 3rd Floor

 

Paula Whitacre, author of A Civil Life in an Uncivil Time: Julia Wilbur's Struggle for Purpose will discuss Wilbur's life, work in Civil War Alexandria, and the diary project that brought her words to life.

Free, light refreshments, book-signing

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Aug
30
5:00 PM17:00

FOAA Summer Social

Daniel O'Connell's Irish Restaurant and Bar

112 King Street

Alexandria, 22314

There has never been a more exciting time to be a part of Alexandria Archaeology! Join current Friends of Alexandria Archaeology members and city archaeologists for happy hour on the second floor of Daniel O’Connell’s Irish Restaurant and Bar. Learn how you can support the preservation of the city’s archaeological heritage, and hear about the exclusive benefits offered to FOAA members.

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Jun
15
3:00 PM15:00

Bon Voyage Event!

116 S. Quaker Lane (Bus Barn)

Free event, donations onsite encouraged

Join us in saying farewell to Alexandria’s 18th-century ship as she begins one last voyage before returning to her final port! The City of Alexandria has awarded Texas A&M University’s (TAMU) Conservation Research Laboratory in College Station, Texas the contract to conserve the ship discovered by archaeologists during construction of the Hotel Indigo on the City’s historic waterfront. Once the multi-year conservation process is complete, the ship’s wooden timbers will be able to return to Alexandria for future generations to study and appreciate.

This family-friendly event will feature an opportunity to see the ship being packed for its journey to TAMU, interactive activities related to the ship and conservation process, and a ceremonial bottle breaking to celebrate the ship’s send-off.

The event is supported in part by the new Hotel Indigo! Additionally, the hotel is offering a "Save our Ship" promotion where guests can receive 15% off the room rate. A $10 donation goes to the Save Our Ship conservation fund.

Snag a late lunch or early dinner on the day of the event at Rocklands BBQ (just across the street at 25 S. Quaker Lane) – they will be contributing 20% of sales to the conservation of the ship!

 

Free but reservations are required. Proper footwear and close-toed shoes are recommended. Limited on-street parking is available – carpooling and public transport recommended. Reserve your tickets at www.shop.alexandriava.gov/Events.aspx. Donate to Save Our Ship today! www.shop.alexandriava.gov/MakeDonation.aspx?skuid=2004514

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Jun
3
1:30 PM13:30

First look at Shuter's Hill Excavations for 2017!

Discover Archaeology at Shuter’s Hill

 

Get the first look at this year’s excavations at Shuter’s Hill, an 18th century urban plantation located on the grounds of the George Washington Masonic National Memorial. Visit the site on Saturday, June 3 to discuss recent findings and interpretations with city archaeologists and students from George Washington University. Excavations at the site have revealed structures dating before, during, and after the Civil War.

The family-friendly open house will be held at the top of the grassy hill behind the Masonic Memorial parking lot and will run from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m., and again from 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. Visitors arriving by car may park in the Masonic Memorial’s parking lot and walk up the grassy slope toward a large shade tree on top of the hill.

While on the grounds, consider visiting the George Washington Masonic National Memorial. For more information, visit www.gwmemorial.org.

The archaeology open house is free and open to the public. For more information or in case of inclement weather, please call 703.746.4399.  

 

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Jun
3
10:00 AM10:00

First look at Shuter's Hill Excavations for 2017!

Discover Archaeology at Shuter’s Hill

Get the first look at this year’s excavations at Shuter’s Hill, an 18th century urban plantation located on the grounds of the George Washington Masonic National Memorial. Visit the site on Saturday, June 3 to discuss recent findings and interpretations with city archaeologists and students from George Washington University. Excavations at the site have revealed structures dating before, during, and after the Civil War.

The family-friendly open house will be held at the top of the grassy hill behind the Masonic Memorial parking lot and will run from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. (again from 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m). Visitors arriving by car may park in the Masonic Memorial’s parking lot and walk up the grassy slope toward a large shade tree on top of the hill.

While on the grounds, consider visiting the George Washington Masonic National Memorial. For more information, visit www.gwmemorial.org.

The archaeology open house is free and open to the public. For more information or in case of inclement weather, please call 703.746.4399.  

 

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May
6
10:00 AM10:00

"Lost Alexandria"

Alexandria Archaeology Museum, 105 North Union Street, #327

In celebration of Preservation Month, the Friends of Alexandria Archaeology (FOAA) and Alexandria Archaeology Museum are hosting a free Java Jolt lecture. Jay Roberts will discuss his new book, Lost Alexandria: An Illustrated History of Sixteen Destroyed Homes in and Around Alexandria, Virginia. Learn about the houses and their environs, as well as the owners and dwellers including Colonel William Fairfax, Benjamin Hallowell, Portia Lee Hodgson, and John “Jacky” Parke Curtis. A book signing will follow the lecture.

Free and open to the public. 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. Reservations are required. Email archaeology@alexandriava.gov or call 703.746.4399.

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Oct
22
10:00 AM10:00

Java Jolt: Archaeology Surrounding Major Braddock’s 4th Encampment at Little Meadows, Maryland

Mark Ludlow presents an illustrated lecture based on the first comprehensive metal-detecting survey of the Braddock Road in Western Maryland--a key area related to the French and Indian War.

Alexandria Archaeology Museum, Torpedo Factory, Union Street, Alexandria

Free, light refreshments provided

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Oct
15
10:00 AM10:00

Java Jolt Lecture: The Octagon House

Alexandria Archaeology Museum, 105 N. Union Street (Torpedo Factory), 3rd floor

Free, but reservations required (703-746-4399 or archaeology@alexandriava.gov

From 1856 to 1866 an octagonal house stood on the grounds of the First Baptist Church at 2932 King Street. For its short existence, the unique house played a remarkable role during a turbulent time in Alexandria’s history. Built in 1856 by Sarah W. Hall, a cultivated and refined New Yorker, who relocated her family to the Alexandria area, the house’s design and concrete construction were unusual in Northern Virginia. 

After the outbreak of the Civil War in the spring of 1861, the house’s location along Leesburg Turnpike and in the vicinity of several Union Army fortifications led to its use as a headquarters by several Union regiments and as a regimental hospital. In particular, the Octagon House was associated with U.S. Brigadier General John Sedgwick (1813-1864) and Amy Morris Bradley (1823-1904), a remarkable nurse, whose abilities led her to the United States Sanitary Commission where she rose through the ranks to become Special Relief Agent. In that capacity she transformed makeshift army hospitals from unsanitary camps into clean, efficiently-run hospitals. 

The house burned to the ground in 1866. As all above-ground physical traces of it disappeared, the house’s history all but faded as well. Julia Claypool’s narrative will weave together the fascinating history and people associated with an all but forgotten landmark. 

Ms. Claypool, a historian and cultural resources planner, surveys buildings and writes architectural narratives and prepares historical and architectural documentation. She is the former Historic Site Administrator and Director of the Carlyle House Historic Park in Alexandria. 

The lecture is sponsored by Friends of Alexandria Archaeology (FOAA) in celebration of Virginia Archaeology Month. 

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Aug
11
6:30 PM18:30

Union Hospitals in Civil War Alexandria

Join historian, Peggy Harlow, for a 6:30 p.m. or 7:30 p.m. presentation on Alexandria’s Civil War hospital buildings, including the real Mansion House Hospital, of Mercy Street fame.

 Copies of the “Alexandria Civil War Hospitals Walking Tour” brochure will be available.

 The lecture is part of the Torpedo Factory Art Center’s Endless Summer: 2nd Thursday Art Night, from 6 -9 p.m., when the entire building is filled with music and merriment.

All events are free and open to the public

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Jul
18
to Jul 22

Alexandria Archaeology Summer Camp

July 18-22, from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

Fort Ward Park, 4301 West Braddock Road

Campers work alongside Alexandria’s City archaeologists excavating a real archaeological site. Campers will use professional excavating, recording, and artifact processing methods, while uncovering Alexandria’s buried past while protecting the City’s valuable historic resources.

12 to 15 year-olds, $400/camper, scholarships available.

https://www.alexandriava.gov/historic/info/default.aspx?id=28120

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